ON WHAT DAY WERE YOU BORN?












Ask any European his or her date of birth, the answer is given within a second, but go on further to ask, “On what day were you born?”  That’s really a tough question to answer, because a day of the week on which one is born, is less important to them.
In Africa, especially Ghana, traditionally, a day of the week determines the name given to a baby. We’ve heard often that a good name is better than riches. Many are given names of great people, but for ages, Ghanaians follow the tradition of their ancestral to give names to babies.
A male child born on Sunday is given ‘Kwesi’, and ‘Akosua’ goes to a female child because Sunday in Akan language is called ‘Kwesida.’ ‘Kodwo or Kojo’, goes to a male child born on Monday and ‘Adwoa or Ajoa’ goes to a female child, because Monday is ‘Edzuda’. ‘Kobina’ is given to a male child born on Tuesday and ‘Abena’ to a female child, because Tuesday is ‘Ebenada.’
On Wednesday, a male child is named ‘Kweku or Kwaku’ and a female child is named ‘Akua’, because Wednesday is ‘Ikuda.’ ‘Yaw’ goes to a male child born on Thursday and ‘Yaa’ goes to a female child, because Thursday is ‘Yawda, pronounced ‘Yauda.’ ‘Kofi’ goes to a male child born on Friday and ‘Afua’ goes to a female child, because Friday is ‘Ifida.’ Finally ‘Ato, Kwame or Kwamena’, goes to a male child born on Saturday and ‘Ama’ goes to a female child, because Saturday is ‘Miminda.’
In Ghana, a male child can be named ‘Mensah’ because he is the third child of his parents and ‘Mansa’ to a third female child. This tradition of naming babies has inspired many foreigners, including Europeans and Americans to give them themselves traditional names corresponding with the day they were born.
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